What is Foot Drop?

Foot drop describes the inability to raise the front part of the foot due to weakness or paralysis of the muscles that lift the foot. As a result, individuals with foot drop scuff their toes along the ground or bend their knees to lift their foot higher than usual to avoid the scuffing, which causes what is called a “steppage” gait.

Foot drop can be unilateral (affecting one foot) or bilateral (affecting both feet). Foot drop is a symptom of an underlying problem and is either temporary or permanent, depending on the cause. Causes include: neurodegenerative disorders of the brain that cause muscular problems, such as multiple sclerosis, stroke, and cerebral palsy; motor neuron disorders such as polio, some forms of spinal muscular atrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease); injury to the nerve roots, such as in spinal stenosis; peripheral nerve disorders such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease or acquired peripheral neuropathy; local compression or damage to the peroneal nerve as it passes across the fibular bone below the knee; and muscle disorders, such as muscular dystrophy or myositis.

Is there any treatment?

Treatment depends on the specific cause of foot drop. The most common treatment is to support the foot with light-weight leg braces and shoe inserts, called ankle-foot orthotics (AFO). Exercise therapy to strengthen the muscles and maintain joint motion also helps to improve gait. Devices that electrically stimulate the peroneal nerve during swing and stance as necessary are appropriate for a small number of individuals with foot drop. In cases with permanent loss of movement, surgery that fuses the foot and ankle joint or that transfers tendons from stronger leg muscles is occasionally performed.

What is the prognosis?

The prognosis for foot drop depends on the cause. Foot drop caused by trauma or nerve damage usually shows partial or even complete recovery. For progressive neurological disorders, foot drop will be a symptom that is likely to continue as a lifelong disability, but it will not shorten life expectancy. Often with progressive neurological disorders, the treatment can change, often alternative orthotic solutions can be applied for changing stages of the condition.

How can OLAB help?

Orthotic Consultation for treatment or prevention of foot drop including measurement / fitting can be arranged by our qualified clinical team –  contact us for more information on what is available or to book.

We have some exciting changes happening at the Orthotic Centre.

Changes to Service
In line with our customer-focused approach and the Ministry of Health and DHB objectives, we are moving to a decentralised community-based health care service.

Our clinic in Great South Rd is closed

We are currently in the process of moving our manufacturing facilities to a new address in Mt Wellington.

For repairs please call us. 0800 550 632

New Locations
In addition to our current sites in Remuera, Morrin Rd and Albany, we now have new clinics in Mangere East, Wai Health and soon Mt Roskill and Takanini. Addresses for our clinics are on the website. Call your nearest centre.